Morning Edition for Thursday, March 20, 2014

Australian officials say they are searching the Indian Ocean southwest of Perth after satellite images found objects that are possibly connected to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Host David Greene talks to former Boeing safety engineer Todd Curtis about what might have taken place on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, and what the next steps are in searching for the plane.

Obama's Surgeon General Nominee Stuck In Limbo

President Obama's nominee for surgeon general has a medical degree and an MBA, but his confirmation is being held up in the Senate because of special-interest politics and Democrats facing tough re-election campaigns.

Opposition Fails To Maintain Momentum In Venezuela

Venezuela has cracked down on student protests, leaving 29 people dead. The main square in Caracas, where protesters were based, has been dismantled. The opposition is divided over what to do next.
Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg says his memorial to the victims of a random shooting in Norway is a "memory wound." His plan to slice through the end of a peninsula creates, not illustrates, loss.

Tattoo Of Handgun Triggers Call To Police

Michael Smith has tattoo of a gun on his stomach. This week, he woke up to a crew cutting trees, so he went out tell them to stop — with his shirt off. A bit later he woke up again — to a SWAT team.
The latest drought has revived questions about the viability of farming in Nevada desert. While some farmers have given up, others are experimenting with crops like grapes that require less water.
U.S. border officials are constantly on alert for drugs coming in from Mexico. But they are also on the lookout for huge sums of cash leaving the U.S. and trickling back into Mexican communities.
Starbucks is testing an evening menu that includes wine at more than 25 locations. Now, the company's chief operating officer says it plans to offer its nighttime fare at thousands of U.S. stores.

FAA Review Finds Dreamliner 'Fundamentally Sound'

A review by the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing has concluded that the troubled 787 known as the Dreamliner is safe.
David Wessel of the Brookings Institution talks about Janet Yellen's first policy meeting and press conference since taking over as chairwoman of the Federal Reserve.

Wait. How Much Is That Doggy?

A Chinese property developer has reportedly paid close to $2 million for a golden-haired Tibetan mastiff puppy. The lion-looking dogs have become a status symbol for China's very rich.
Crimea is a poor region, heavily subsidized by Kiev, and gets all its gas, water and food from Ukraine. Russia doesn't even have a land link with the Crimean peninsula and absorbing it will affect banks, schools, tourism and pensions for residents.

Will Sanctions Against Russia Work?

In Brussels on Thursday, EU leaders will discuss stronger sanctions against Russia. Juan Zarate, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, talks about their options.
Nuns runs La Posada Providencia, a shelter in south Texas, just across from Mexico. But the asylum seekers are a veritable United Nations, coming from places like Ethiopia, Albania and Nepal.
Host David Greene gets the latest from NPR's Frank Langfitt about the potential debris from Malaysia Flight 370 spotted by satellite imagery in the southern Indian Ocean.
Einstein's theory of relativity explains the universe. But — in part because of a math error — some recently uncovered work by the great physicist is wrong. Really, really wrong.
OK, maybe it just munched vegetation, small animals and eggs. But this newly named dino looked like a cross between a chicken and a bulked-up ostrich. Five-inch claws? We'd have stayed out of its way.
Paul Janeway's mother threw away his copy of Nirvana's Nevermind when he was a kid. The leader of St. Paul and the Broken Bones says his strict religious upbringing is key to the musician he became.
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