Morning Edition for Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.

'Captain Underpants' 2013's Most Vilified Book

The top spot on the American Library Association's annual list of most challenged books goes to The Adventures of Captain Underpants — for the second year in a row.
The coverage of the crisis in Ukraine portrays the government in Kiev as neo-Nazis who seized power in a violent coup. That narrative has had a powerful impact on the way Russians perceive the crisis.
Millions signed up for health insurance through state exchanges and HealthCare.gov. But another several million bypassed the exchanges and bought health coverage directly from insurers.
For women, lower average career earnings translate into smaller Social Security payments. Acting Social Security Commissioner Carolyn Colvin says women shouldn't wait to start saving for retirement.

2 Senior Executives Leave General Motors

The departures of the senior vice presidents for Communications and for Human Resources, follows on the heels of strong criticism of the company's handling of the recall of nearly 2.6 million cars.
A tablet computer assembled in Port-au-Prince makes the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation the latest player on the high-tech stage. Economists hope such jobs help grow Haiti's middle class.

Retailers Want Your Tax Refund

It's the deadline to file your taxes. And if you're getting a money back, retailers want it. They're offering sales and promotions to separate you from your hard-earned refund.
One year ago, the Boston Marathon became more than just one of the world's major sporting events. It also became a target. Three people were killed and dozens injured in the bombing.
Journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, went to two paper for their coverage of the leak of National Security Agency documents. The Post and Guardian relied on data provided by Edward Snowden.
Russia and Ukraine were the major contributors to the Soviet army. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moscow and Kiev continued to cooperate. The recent crisis transformed friend into foe.
A plant growth chamber is headed to the International Space Station. It's called Veggie and it sort of looks like a pillow that you can see through, all lit up in pink with lettuce inside.

Florida's Freshwater Springs Attract Vacationers

Florida is most popular for its beaches and theme parks but it has hundreds of freshwater springs too. In central Florida, no springs may be more prized than those at Ichetucknee Springs State Park.
Not all whole grain breads are created equal. Choosing breads with fully intact grains (think nuggets of whole rye, wheat or millet) may help control blood sugar and stave off hunger.
To see if low blood sugar sours even good relationships, scientists used an unusual tool: voodoo dolls representing spouses. As hunger levels rose, so did the number of pins.

Empathy: How Should We Care About One Another?

Kelly McEvers talks to Leslie Jamison, author of the new essay collection, The Empathy Exams: Essays. The book takes the writer on a quest to figure out how others feel empathy.
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