Morning Edition for Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.

Sad Panda In China Gets Her Own Play Area

Si Jia got depressed after her only companion moved to another zoo. The staff at the Yunnan Safari Park in southwest China built her a swing and parallel bars. She may get a real friend soon.

Unique Rose Bush Graces Arizona Desert Town

The world's largest rose bush is located in an unlikely place for a genteel attraction: Tombstone, Arizona. It blooms during spring break; thousands come to see the bush that was planted in 1885.
In 2005, a group of anonymous donors in Kalamazoo launched a bold program. It pays for graduates of the city's public schools to attend any of Michigan's public universities or community colleges.
The city has reached a tentative agreement with retired police officers and firefighters to preserve their pensions. Pensions of other city retirees would take a 4.5 percent hit.
After years of circulation declines and painful staffing cuts, this year's two Pulitzer Prizes are especially sweet. David Greene talks to Marty Baron, the executive editor for The Washington Post.

Ex-Defense Secretary Rumsfeld Criticizes Tax System

Donald Rumsfeld has made complaining to the IRS a bit of a tradition. In this year's letter to the IRS he writes: I have absolutely no idea whether our tax returns and our tax payments are accurate.
A flood protection authority is suing to try to hold the oil and gas industries responsible for Louisiana's land crisis. But policymakers are trying to stop the lawsuit, saying it's bad for business.
Dozens of boats, helicopters and divers scrambled Wednesday to rescue more than 470 people after a ferry sank off South Korea's southern coast. Among those on the boat, 325 high school students.
The racism Gandhi encountered in South Africa helped spark a lifetime of activism. Historian Ramachandra Guha says without that experience, "he would never have become a political animal."

Police Trace Heavy-Breathing Emergency Caller

Police near London received a troubling call, and all the dispatcher could hear was heavy breathing. Cops found the caller running through a yard. It was a dog with a wireless phone in its mouth.

Tank Movement Increases Tensions In Eastern Ukraine

Several Ukrainian tanks are on the move in some eastern cities, according to reports Wednesday morning. Some of the armored personnel carriers are flying Russian flags.
The Demographics Unit was trying to root out terrorist threats, but never produced a usable lead. Kelly McEvers talks to journalist Matt Apuzzo, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the unit.

A T. Rex Treks To Washington For A Shot At Fame

The Smithsonian is set to unpack something it's never had before: a rare, nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. It's a gift from a Montana museum that says this T. rex deserves to be famous.
The National Hockey League playoffs start Wednesday night, and the National Basketball Association playoffs begin Saturday. We run down the post-season picture for both sports.

Despite Everything, Tiger Will Always Be No. 1

Tiger Woods hasn't won a major in six years, and at 38, says commentator Frank Deford, he's past even a golfer's prime years. Still, no one can touch the reigning king of golf.
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