Morning Edition for Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Drug Protocol Goes Wrong In Oklahoma Execution

A death-row inmate died of a heart attack after the state attempted to execute him by lethal injection. Renee Montagne talks to Ziva Branstetter, a reporter for Tulsa Word, who covered the execution.
Iraqis vote Wednesday in the country's first national election since U.S. forces withdrew in 2011. Steve Inskeep talks to Prashant Rao, Iraq bureau chief for Agence France Presse.
Shooting deaths of foreign national is up along the Southwest border. The agency has been called to modify its use-of-lethal-force policy. But it has a culture of secrecy and lacks transparency.

Cannabis Industry Sponsors Colorado Symphony Shows

The symphony sees it as a way to reach a younger, more diverse audience. Marijuana is legal in Colorado but it won't be for sale at the concession stands.
Colleges are teaching students what's known as bystander intervention, based on the idea that both men and women can intervene to interrupt behaviors that could lead to sexual assault.
Afghanistan is not just a world leader in producing drugs. It's also a leading consumer. Drug users addicted to heroin, and more recently, crystal meth, are everywhere in the western city of Herat.

High Court Ruling Likely To Control Patent Trolls

The Supreme Court on Tuesday made it easier for companies to get their legal fees paid when they are unreasonably sued for patent infringement. Patent trolls own patents but don't make any products.
French economist Thomas Piketty's book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, has become a sensation. He's been all over the media, and he's lecturing to packed houses on his current U.S. tour.

Mark Zuckerberg Is Immortalized In Wax

Madame Tussauds unveiled the life-size statue of the Facebook CEO at their museum in San Francisco. The museum says Zuckerberg did not make himself available for a sitting, so artists used photos.
Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling has been banned for life from the NBA. Sterling's punishment follows racist remarks he made that were caught on tape.
The U.S. and Europe have different car safety standards. Some of them are small while others are more dramatic. All car makers agree that the different standards are a pain. So why the difference?
One community has lost so many men that it's now called the Island of Widows. Researchers are struggling to figure out the cause of the disease. Some suspect a popular herbicide.
This new kitchen tool promises to scramble egg whites and the yolk to create delicious culinary creations, and save you from washing a whisk. A soft cradle keeps the egg from breaking.

What Is Plan B For Mideast Peace Negotations?

A deadline U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry set to either end or extend the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks has expired. Kerry says the next step is a pause.
The controversy over Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's fight with the federal government seems to have come out of nowhere. It, however, is just the latest skirmish in a fight that's goes back 150 years.
Environmental groups that have mired the Keystone XL pipeline in delays now are focusing on LNG export terminals. They say opening up exports of natural gas will hasten domestic hydraulic fracturing.
The Obama administration has sent to Congress a four-year $302 billion infrastructure bill. It proposes closing corporate loopholes to make up for lost revenues from the gas tax.
LA Clippers fans have always supported their team, if not its owner Donald Sterling. We check in with people outside the Staples Center, where the Clippers played Golden State in the NBA playoffs.
As the Donald Sterling controversy unfolds, commentator Frank Deford recalls scandals surrounding other team owners, and penalties they did or didn't pay.
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