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Inside the lab of electron microscope photographer David Scharf




Gray debris dust from World Trade Center Disaster.
Gray debris dust from World Trade Center Disaster.
David Scharf
Gray debris dust from World Trade Center Disaster.
Human Lymphocyte Cells. The three major types of lymphocyte are T cells, B cells and natural killer (NK) cells. These NK cells are a part of the innate immune system and play a major role in defending the host from both tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells distinguish infected cells and tumors from normal and uninfected cells by recognizing changes of surface molecules. T-cells play a central role in cell-mediated immunity.
David Scharf
Gray debris dust from World Trade Center Disaster.
Jumping spider
David Scharf


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David Scharf is a buddhist, a guitarist, a scientist and artist who works nocturnally. He's also one of the world's leading names in electron microscope photography: those giant, luminescent photos of incredibly small things like bugs, dust, and nerves. His art's appeared in books, galleries, universities -- and the covers of Newsweek and National Geographic.

Off-Ramp producer Kevin Ferguson visited Scharf and toured his Echo Park home laboratory.

See more of Scharf's photos and take a tour of his lab on our new visual blog, Audiovision.