Patt Morrison for November 19, 2009

Predictive Policing, a real-life “Minority Report”?

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Researchers and criminal justice leaders are gathering in Los Angeles this week to develop and discuss the concept of “predictive policing.” Lauded as a major crime fighting tool, predictive policing combines technology and statistical analysis to identify crime hot spots and forecast who is likely to commit crimes, at what times, and in which locations…are you thinking Tom Cruise in “Minority Report”? Former LAPD Chief Bill Bratton was an advocate of the program, but civil liberties scholars are beginning to raise concerns over privacy and civil rights issues associated with the predictive analytics. How can police use this new technology to better fight crime without eroding our civil liberties?

Researchers and criminal justice leaders are gathering in Los Angeles this week to develop and discuss the concept of “predictive policing.” Lauded as a major crime fighting tool, predictive policing combines technology and statistical analysis to identify crime hot spots and forecast who is likely to commit crimes, at what times, and in which locations…are you thinking Tom Cruise in “Minority Report”? Former LAPD Chief Bill Bratton was an advocate of the program, but civil liberties scholars are beginning to raise concerns over privacy and civil rights issues associated with the predictive analytics. How can police use this new technology to better fight crime without eroding our civil liberties?

Guests:

Kristina Rose, acting director of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) at the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice

James Burch, acting director Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), at the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice

Chief Bill Bratton, former LAPD Chief and current CEO of Altegrity security firm


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