Patt Morrison for July 12, 2010

David Kilcullen's “Counterinsurgency”

Mercer 8514

Oxford University Press

Kilcullen delves into the mind of a military strategist, defining both counterinsurgency and counter-terrorism tactics and laying out his views on the current situation in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

Against a backdrop of two wars for which the American public has grown weary and increasingly hopeless, the U.S. military has generated some more petty, almost gossip-like media attention in the past several months, from lifting the veil on its internal ruminations on Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, to the embarrassing resignation of its top general in Afghanistan and a reshuffling of command. The media attention may have done more to steer attention away from the wars, but serious obstacles remain in both. Military strategist and advisor David Kilcullen joins Patt with a behind-the-scenes analysis of where to go next. A former adviser to General David Petraeus in Iraq and to General Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan, Kilcullen’s knowledge of modern warfare influenced the 2007 surge in Iraq and many contemporary military leaders. In his new book Counterinsurgency, Kilcullen delves into the mind of a military strategist, defining both counterinsurgency and counterterrorism tactics and laying out his views on the current situation in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere.

Guest:

David Kilcullen, currently an adviser to NATO and former Senior Counterinsurgency Adviser to General David Petraeus in Iraq and adviser to General Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan; adjunct professor of security studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a fellow at the Center for New American Security; author of The Accidental Guerilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One


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