Patt Morrison for October 28, 2010

When will Mexico's drug war reach its tipping point?

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Mexican police investigate a violent incident on March 21, 2010 in Juarez, Mexico. The border city of Juarez has been racked by violent drug related crime recently and has quickly become one of the most dangerous cities in the world.

It's been a terribly bloody week in Mexico. with at least 40 murders that all have ties to drug cartels: 13 patients in a Tijuana drug rehab were massacred; gunmen killed six young men in a tough neighborhood of Mexico City, which has up until now been largely spared from cartel violence; two bus-loads of factory workers attacked in Ciudad Juarez, killing four; and 15 people killed at a car wash in the Pacific coastal city of Tepic. Thousands of Mexicans have lost their lives over the past few years in a drug war that seemingly has no end, and while the murder rate has stayed relatively static the brutal nature of the killings has become more explosive. At what point does the Mexican government, and ordinary Mexican citizens, throw up their hands and say enough? At what point does the American government get more involved to help, and at what point do officials on both sides of the border start to try new tactics, from drug legalization to even negotiating with the cartels?

Guest:

Jorge Castañeda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico (2000-2003); currently Global Distinguished Professor of Politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University


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