<em>Patt Morrison</em> is known for its innovative discussions of local politics and culture, as well as its presentation of the effects of national and world news on Southern California.
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Much I DO about nothing




Denise and Mark Duffield-Thomas ride to their ceremony in a Rolls Royce before renewing their wedding vows for the 81st time at Hayman Island in the Whitsunday Islands, Australia.
Denise and Mark Duffield-Thomas ride to their ceremony in a Rolls Royce before renewing their wedding vows for the 81st time at Hayman Island in the Whitsunday Islands, Australia.
Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images

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According to a recent poll conducted by TIME magazine in association with Pew Research Center, 40% of Americans believe that marriage is obsolete. Yes, you read that correctly – obsolete. Eight times as many children are born out of wedlock today than in 1960, those without a college education are increasingly less likely to get married and Americans that do get married are waiting longer and longer before they tie the knot – the average age being about 28 for men and 26 for women. Why are people less inclined to take the plunge? It seems that even though marriage remains revered and even desired by many Americans it is also not practically necessary in the way it used to be. So, what difference does it make if you I DO or if you I DON'T?

Guests:

Radhika Jones, Deputy Managing Editor for TIME magazine

Stephanie Coontz, Professor of History and Family Studies at Evergreen State College and author of A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s