Patt Morrison for January 24, 2011

Are American Muslims being radicalized?

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Islamic leaders and organizers of over 55 mosques participate in a news conference and protest on the steps of City Hall to defend the presence of mosques in the United States on September 1, 2010 in New York City.

The hearing has caused a major stir, without even being formally scheduled. Congressman Peter King, a New York Republican who is know for speaking bluntly on matters of national security, is planning on holding a hearing, in his new role as chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, on the threat posed by radical Islam in America. Rep. King plans to focus on the shootings at Ft. Hood and the bombing attempt in Times Square, both of which were perpetrated by American Muslims. Just the announcement alone has caused controversy on both sides of the issues—security hawks are disappointed that more aggressive advocates against radical Islam are not being called as witnesses, while Muslim American groups are very weary that they will all be characterized as terrorists in waiting. There does seem to be anecdotal evidence of more terrorism attempts carried out by American citizens of Muslims decent, but there’s also a sizable Muslim population in the U.S. that is well educated and very successful. Is radicalization really a threat?

Guests:

Hussam Ayloush, Executive Director of the Council on American Islamic Relations in Los Angeles

Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Advisor to the President at the RAND Corporation


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