<em>Patt Morrison</em> is known for its innovative discussions of local politics and culture, as well as its presentation of the effects of national and world news on Southern California.
Hosted by
Airs

Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other




How connected are you really if your main form of communication is over the internet?
How connected are you really if your main form of communication is over the internet?
Basic Books

Listen to story

17:29
Download this story 8.0MB

It’s 2011 – the age of smart phones, text messaging, Facebook and Twitter. Sure, you can communicate in the blink of an eye with these electronic avenues, but it seems that as communication technology increases, actual physical interaction between human beings decreases. Just a few years ago, talking on the phone was the preferred form of communication, and while it isn’t person to person, at least there’s a real human voice involved. But now even a phone call can be considered too clunky – text messaging, instant messaging, and social media sites take the cake for communication now. So while it’s quicker and easier, is this technology dependence (and for many addiction) really giving us the lives we want to lead? How connected are you really if your main form of communication is over the internet? Sherry Turkle, a clinical psychologist from MIT, is here to talk about this phenomenon and her forecast for the future of human interaction and intimacy.

Guest:

Sherry Turkle, Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology in the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at MIT; founder and current director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self