Patt Morrison for February 1, 2011

Roger Ebert’s back with a new voice

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Film critic Roger Ebert accepts the ShoWest Career Achievement in Film Journalism Award at the Paris Las Vegas during ShoWest, April 2, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Film critic Roger Ebert, who lost his ability to speak due to damage done during treatment and surgery for cancer of the thyroid and jaw, says he absolutely won’t go through another attempt to rebuild his jaw. His voice, however, is being digitally reconstructed by a Scottish company called CereProc, using recordings from his past TV shows.

With a new prosthesis, and soon with a new voice, Ebert is launching his latest TV program, Ebert Presents at the Movies. Director Werner Herzog and newsman Bill Kurtis do voice-overs of his reviews and co-host Cindy Lemire of The Associated Press adds to the mix. To find out how the customized electronic voice will work we talk with the man creating it, and to Ms. Lemire on this new experiment in programming.

Guests:

Dr. Matthew Aylett, Chief Technical Officer for CereProc, a Scottish company based in Edinburgh that conducts advanced speech synthesis research and is creating a digitized version of Roger Ebert’s voice using recordings from his past TV shows

Christy Lemire, film critic for The Associated Press; co-host of the new show, Ebert Presents at the Movies


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