Patt Morrison for February 8, 2011

Death by a thousand cuts: the national, multi-layered movement to repeal health care reform

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Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

Members of Congress hold up signs from the second floor of the U.S. Capitol that read 'Kill The Bill' on Capitol Hill on March 21, 2010 in Washington, DC.

Last March, Congress passed the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare or the health care reform law) much to the chagrin of a large chunk of Americans and lawmakers. The battle may be over, but apparently the war isn’t. Republicans vowed early on to come after the law full-swing as soon as they had a majority in either house of Congress. So when the Republican majority House of Representatives of the 112th Congress took over in January, lo and behold, one of the first things new Speaker of the House John Boehner did was call for a vote to repeal the law. Not shockingly, it passed the House, but wasn’t nearly as successful in the Senate. Congressional efforts aside, 28 states have filed or signed onto joint lawsuits challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality, and 38 state legislatures are considering drafting laws to curtail portions of the law. It doesn’t stop there – grassroots efforts, some of which have been very successful, are underway across the nation being led by organizations like Freedom Works, Tea Party Patriots, and Americans for Prosperity. While anti-reform voices are loud, so are pro-reform voices. California’s Attorney General, Kamala Harris, recently issued a joint statement with seven other state attorneys general defending the Affordable Care Act. So how successful will these attempts be? Legally, how much of a chance do they stand? In any case, it doesn’t seem like those fighting against the law are going anywhere for a long time.

Guests:

Ron Pollack, executive director, Families USA

Dallas Woodhouse, director, North Carolina chapter of Americans for Prosperity


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