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The United States and Egypt – what next?




U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement on Egypt at the White House briefing room February 11, 2011 in Washington, DC. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resigned from his position and handed over power to the Egyptian military.
U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement on Egypt at the White House briefing room February 11, 2011 in Washington, DC. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resigned from his position and handed over power to the Egyptian military.
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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In response to Hosni Mubarak’s resignation today, President Obama said in a statement that the president of Egypt "responded to the Egyptian people's hunger for change.” He cautioned that "this is not the end of Egypt's transition. It's a beginning. I'm sure there will be difficult days ahead, and many questions remain unanswered." Many questions, indeed. Mubarak leaves behind a police state with the military in charge and a host of uncertainties about how that country will be governed going forward and how the partnership between the U.S. and Egypt will change. Congressman Brad Sherman, a senior member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, gives his assessment of our future relationship with arguably the strongest nation in the Middle East.

Guests:

Rep. Brad Sherman, D–CA's 27th District; a senior member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the top Democrat on the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation and Trade.