Patt Morrison for March 14, 2011

In the wake of a massive earthquake and tsunami, Japan’s humanitarian crisis worsens

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AFP/ Getty Images / Jui Press

A man comforts a woman as she cries in front of her damaged home in the town of Watari in Miyagi prefecture on March 14, 2011

The world is nervously watching the fate of at least five nuclear power plants in Japan that are all in danger of melting down, and closer to home we’re worrying about our preparations for a mega-quake in California, but it’s crucial to remember that there is a desperate humanitarian crisis underway in northern Japan. A tide of bodies washed up along the Japanese coastline today, with death tolls expected to rise into the tens of thousands; millions of people faced a fourth night without food, water or heating in near-freezing temperatures; the stock market plunged over the likelihood of huge losses by Japanese industries; and relief agencies are having a difficult time getting aid into the devastated areas along the northern Japanese coast line. Japan is Asia’s richest country but the wealth and resources can not keep up with the size and scope of the disaster—how will the needy get help and can Japan recover from this devastation?

Guests:

Stacy Ragan, manager for the international response operation center, American Red Cross in Washington D.C.

John Yeager, Media Relations Director, World Vision


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