Patt Morrison for July 27, 2011

Final delivery: as the Post Service withers, do we care?

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A U.S. Postal Service customer enters the Bayview Station on July 26, 2011 in San Francisco, California. The U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut up to 3,700 of its 32,000 post offices across the country as they seek ways to cut financial losses as mail volume dwindles.

We’ve been hearing of the pain and slow demise of the U.S. Postal Service for several years now. E-mail and text messages, tablets and smart phones, all on top of private express delivery services have meant a loss of revenue for the postal service. Price of stamps has increased and the idea of ending Saturday delivery has been kicked around, but nobody had seriously discussed the end of mail as we know it, until now. Yesterday, the postal service released a list of 3,700 post offices it has slated for closure, over 100 of which are in California. Wherever you live in the Southland, chances are a post office near you will close before the end of this year. According to the list, which is open for public comment for the next 60 days, Compton and Beverly Hills will each lose at least one post office; so will Laguna Woods, San Bernardino and the cities of Ontario and Orange. Inglewood will lose four; at least 10 are on the chopping block in Los Angeles. In total, it only amounts to about 1% of the 32,000 post offices across the country. Still, with those closures comes a loss of jobs as well as access to mail service in poor and rural communities where private services can’t turn a profit and residents may not have access to the newest technology.

Guest:

Rep. Karen Bass, (D-Los Angeles), member of the House Budget Committee


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