Patt Morrison for October 6, 2011

Obama gets his groove back

Alex Wong/Getty Images

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the $447 billion jobs bill he sent to Congress during a news conference in the East Room of the White House October 6, 2011 in Washington, DC.

Critics of President Obama have lambasted him for his accommodating political style and willingness to compromise. Both sides of the aisle have had their beefs – with Democrats voicing frustration with his even keeled demeanor and Republicans exhibiting their opposition with a monolithic response to any idea from his administration, a simple “No.”

But Obama held a press conference Thursday during which he pushed back on a number of issues, calling the opposition out for their respective stances. Obama put pressure on Republicans to pass his $447 American Jobs Act, very nearly threatening Republicans to pass it or to be prepared to answer to frustrated voters in the upcoming election.

When asked about the growing “Occupy Wall Street” movement that has expanded to include protests in dozens of American cities, Obama slammed the banking industry for using new financial rules as an excuse to raise fees on cash strapped Americans, saying that the protests “expresses the frustrations the American people feel, that we had the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression, huge collateral damage all throughout the country ... and yet you're still seeing some of the same folks who acted irresponsibly trying to fight efforts to crack down on the abusive practices that got us into this in the first place."

But it wasn’t all domestic issues that Obama addressed; the President also cited how China’s policies of currency manipulation contributed to unfair trading practices and calling Pakistan “an effective partner” in the region.

WEIGH IN:

Has Obama found passion and political will in light of the upcoming election? Can he find traction in dealing with opponents domestic and abroad?

Guests:

Jeanne Cummings, government team deputy editor, Bloomberg News

Manu Raju, Congressional reporter for POLITICO


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