Patt Morrison for October 19, 2011

Norman Corwin, last of radio's Golden Age, dies

HBO's "A Note Of Triumph: The Golden Age Of Norman Corwin" - Inside

Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images

Norman Corwin, giant of radio's Golden Age, died in Los Angeles at age 101 on Tuesday.

Over 70 years, Corwin wrote, produced and directed for television, film and the stage -- but radio was his true passion. He was well known to millions of Americans throughout the 1940s for his creative programs, from variety shows to dramas, comedies to documentaries.

His writing brought the country together in some of his most acclaimed works dealing with World War II. His masterpiece, “On a Note of Triumph,” aired on May 8, 1945 to commemorate the ally victory in Europe. His commentary provided perspective and inspired hope and optimism about the war being fought thousands of miles away. As radio's 'poet laureate,' Corwin asked critical questions about how we should interpret the victory over the Nazis. “What do you say about an incomplete victory?” Corwin asked himself in preparing for the production of “On a Note of Triumph.” “We’ve beaten this monster, Hitler. The war goes on, but what are the questions? And the questions were: who had we beaten? What did it cost to beat him? Have we learned anything out of this war? Is it going to happen again?” he questioned.

His writing earned him Emmy and Golden Globe awards and he even received an Academy Award nomination for his script for the 1956 film ``Lust for Life,'' the biography of Vincent van Gogh, which stars Kirk Douglas. Corwin was also a Writer in Residence at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communications.

Listen here to Patt Morrison's conversation with Norman Corwin to celebrate his 100th birthday, one year ago.

Guests:

Norman Lear, writer, producer and director; political and social activist and philanthropist.

Eric Simonson, producer and director, "A Note of Triumph: The Golden Age of Norman Corwin"


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