Patt Morrison for December 8, 2011

LAPD officers’ personal information targeted by an online protest group called CabinCr3w

Los Angeles Police Move In To Evict Occupy LA Encampment

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An Occupy Los Angeles protester is arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after LAPD raided the protest campsite in the early hours of November 30, 2011 in Los Angeles, California.

In response to the Los Angeles Police Department’s raid on OccupyLA, CabinCr3w, a group associated with Anonymous, posted the names, addresses, emails, and other personal information (including family members) of between 40 and 50 LAPD officers last night.

CabinCr3w states they pulled the information from the public record, and only consolidated it, sending it out in a tweet with a link to a website called “Sticky Paste.” CabinCr3w, which has about 9000 followers on Twitter, stated in an online chat with KPCC staff that their action was in response to being “treated like criminals for practicing a fundamental right”; the LAPD responded by stating the majority of the officers listed had not taken part in the raid, and that the department had “worked hard to give protestors ample notice and avoid arresting people.”

WEIGH IN:

Have the members of CabinCr3w crossed a line, even though the information they used was already publicly available?

GUESTS:

Commander Andrew Smith, commanding officer in the LAPD public information office


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