Patt Morrison for December 26, 2011

All about Griffith Park and the La Brea Tar Pits, if you aren’t visiting them as we speak

Plans For Griffith Park Fire Recovery Sparks Controversy

David McNew/Getty Images

The Griffith Observatory, Griffith Park, 2007.

New York has its 843-acre Central Park; San Francisco has its 1017-acre Golden Gate, but both are tame in comparison to what the city of Los Angeles has to offer—the 4210 unwieldly acres of Griffith Park. Established in 1896 when L.A.’s population was only 110,000, the park used to lie outside city limits. The original donor of the land, Griffith J. Griffith, insisted that rail fares to the park be capped at a nickel so that all of L.A.’s citizens could enjoy it.

The city has grown to surround the park, and many of us living in walking distance, but how much do you know about its history? If you aren’t out walking around in the park itself, join Patt and authors E.J. Stephens and Cathy McNassor to talk about their books on Griffith Park and the La Brea Tar Pits. E.J. Stephens has compiled images and facts on Griffith Park starting from the late 1800s; McNassor is the museum archivist of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the George C. Page Museum at the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits and has put together a visual history of the Tar Pits. The stories of each of these iconic components to our cityscape, today at one o’clock.

WEIGH IN:

Share your favorite stories about these iconic sites. Have you grown up visiting them, or have you just arrived? Did they over- or underwhelm?

Guests:

Cathy McNassor, author, "Los Angeles’s La Brea Tar Pits and Hancock Park"; museum archivist, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the George C. Page Museum

E.J. Stephens, co-author, "Griffith Park"; writer, Deadwrite's Dailies


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