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Why not Jon Huntsman?




Republican candidate for president Jon Huntsman gives an address on foreign policy at Southern New Hampshire University, October 10, 2011 in Manchester, New Hampshire.
Republican candidate for president Jon Huntsman gives an address on foreign policy at Southern New Hampshire University, October 10, 2011 in Manchester, New Hampshire.
Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images

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Just what is wrong with Jon Huntsman? He’s the former US Ambassador to China and the former governor of Utah. He’s got a proven track record of working toward a common goal with politicians outside his own party—a background that seems like it should matter to a nation that consistently gives its Congress less than 10% approval ratings.

New Hampshire’s Concord Monitor endorsed him last week, saying Huntsman “would present the greatest challenge to Obama” and “provide mature, informed and steady leadership.” On paper, he looks like a great candidate for the GOP nomination—and yet, he consistently polls lower than the rest of the candidates, attracting about 2% of the vote.

WEIGH IN

As the Republican field narrows, why hasn't Huntsman caught fire? And how is the field shaping up with less than a week before the Iowa caucus?

Guest:

Ron Elving, senior Washington editor, NPR