Patt Morrison for February 2, 2012

Charles and Ray Eames and the history behind Mid-Century modern

Nick Sherman/Flickr

Eames chairs and other modern furniture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City, 2007.

The set designers for “Mad Men” are facing tough competition these days for finding Mid-Century modern furniture at the Rose Bowl flea market. The sleek and sneakily functional designs popularized by designers like Charles and Ray Eames have been making a strong resurgence in recent years. Those designers didn’t just craft items for a mid-century lifestyle – they shaped the lifestyle itself, with objects people are cherishing to this day. They also fueled what was once a major manufacturing sector in our economy that's been sent offshore. It's cost both quality workmanship and good paying jobs.

WEIGH IN:

Do Angelinos who scour weekend garage sales want to revisit the large picture thinking of Eames? Or is the intent of the designers even relevant any longer?

Guest:

Daniel Ostroff curator of two Eames exhibits that are part of Pacific Standard Time; author, “Eames + Valastro: Design in the life of an American family – A rough sketch”


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