Patt Morrison for February 27, 2012

Anne Rice talks about her return to the supernatural

Knopf, 2012.

After nearly a decade of novels based on the gospels and the life of Christ, Anne Rice has returned to the genre that made her famous: Gothic horror. In her newest work, “The Wolf Gift,” the best-selling author of “Interview with the Vampire” and its spawn, the Vampire Chronicles, tackles a new supernatural subculture: werewolves. The protagonist of “The Wolf Gift,” Reuben Golding, is a “Man Wolf” (or Morphenkinder); the transformation he undergoes is due to a virus transmitted through saliva, “perfected” through a series of experiments by an ancient king, who wanted to harness the virus’ transformative effects for good instead of evil – themes that Rice returns to over and over again, despite what genre she’s writing. In 2010, Rice broke with the Catholic Church – having rejoined a decade earlier – telling NPR’s Michele Norris, "Certainly I will never go back to being that atheist and that pessimist that I was. I live now in a world that I feel God created, and I feel I live in a world where God witnesses everything that happens… That's a huge change from the atheist I was when I wrote the vampire novels." Join Patt as she asks Rice how “The Wolf Gift” differs from her previous works, and where the author thinks she go from here.

Guest:

Anne Rice, best-selling author of “Interview with the Vampire.” Her newest novel is “The Wolf Gift.”


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