<em>Patt Morrison</em> is known for its innovative discussions of local politics and culture, as well as its presentation of the effects of national and world news on Southern California.
Hosted by
Airs

Net migration from Mexico stops




A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent drives along a fence which separates the cities of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora Mexico, a frequent crossing point for people entering the United States illegally, June 2, 2010.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent drives along a fence which separates the cities of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora Mexico, a frequent crossing point for people entering the United States illegally, June 2, 2010.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:25
Download this story 6.0MB

All quiet on the border front? A new study from the Pew Hispanic Center finds that the wave of illegal immigration into the US from Mexico has slowed to a net standstill.

Mexican immigrants aren’t only coming to the United States in far smaller numbers, but some are leaving, too. Migration may be slowing, but as the report points out, the number of U.S.-born Mexican Americans continues to grow. What are the political and social implications? In education it’s going to be huge, fewer students whose first language is Spanish, possibly leading to a shrinking of the massive English learner curriculum. The cultural implications are big too.

What are the political and social implications? In education it’s going to be huge, fewer students whose first language is Spanish, possibly leading to a shrinking of the massive English learner curriculum. The cultural implications are big too.

WEIGH IN:

How does this trend fit into a larger picture of immigration in America? How do you think this migration change will impact the United States?

Guests:

Mark Lopez, associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center