Patt Morrison for May 1, 2012

Not getting enough sleep? The CDC says you’re not alone

Medics Train For Combat Casualty Care At Miami Hospital

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Army Sergeant James Brooks from Columbus, Georgia of the 212th Combat Support Hospital (L) and U.S. Army Specialist Terry Draper from Shreveport, Louisiana find time for a nap during a 24- hour shift at Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center December 8, 2006 in Miami, Florida.

The early bird may get the worm, but that bird may be suffering if it also burned the midnight oil. A new study released by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that as many as one in three American civilian workers gets less than six hours of sleep per night - significantly less than the optimal recommended amount of seven to nine hours.

A chronic lack of sleep can lead to an array of health problems and dire consequences… and not just for the sleep-deprived. The study also found that those in the transportation sector are especially overtired - with 44 percent of truck drivers and 29 percent of taxi and limo drivers not getting enough rest, which the CDC says leads to roughly 20 percent of vehicle accidents. Not exactly reassuring statistics for a nation of people on the move.


WEIGH IN:

Do you get enough sleep? How does your performance and quality of life suffer without enough rest?

Guests:



Alon Y. Avidan, MD, associate professor of Neurology and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at UCLA’s Neurology Clinic

Elizabeth Shannon, "Australia's Natural Sleep Reporter" and author of the e-book “Sleep Mojo – You’ve Lost It, Now Get It Back”


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