Patt Morrison for May 16, 2012

Mitt Romney’s camp ruffles the feathers of a few seasoned reporters

Republican Presidential hopeful Mitt Rom

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Republican Presidential hopeful Mitt Romney in Lynchburg, Virginia, on May 12, 2012.

Reporters covering Mitt Romney’s campaign tweeted complaints on Wednesday of being prevented from asking the presumptive Republican nominee questions at a public event in Florida.

Sara Murray of the Wall Street Journal tweeted:


The grievances came after campaign aides reportedly tried to physically hamper reporters from asking Romney questions. ABC’s Emily Friedman said that most journalists persevered despite being asked to stop and leave by members of the United States Secret Service.

Romney, however, still refused to answer any questions. In an e-mail to Politico, campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul said there had been an “error” on the part of the staff. The incident illustrates the dynamic and anxious relationship between political candidates and the media.

WEIGH IN:

What obligations to reporters, if any, must high-profile politicians fulfill at public events? In a public setting, when, if ever, is it appropriate to block reporters from asking questions of candidates running for public office? How should we define the relationship between a presidential candidate and the press?

Guests:

Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times Washington Columnist, covering national and international politics

Sara Murray, reporter, Wall Street Journal; she was at the event in Florida and tweeted about the incident

Kelly McBride, senior faculty for ethics, at the Poynter Institute


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