Patt Morrison for May 30, 2012

Voting hurdles in the 2012 election

Florida Voters Go To The Polls In The State's Primary

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Ray Roy sets up a polling station as they prepare for voters on primary day on January 31, 2012 in Tampa, Florida.

Elections are decided vote by vote, and some Republicans in a number of battleground states, like Florida, have been putting new voter requirements in place that may be purging legal voters from voting rolls.

Florida passed a new law in 2011 that makes it harder for organizations like the League of Women Voters and Rock the Vote to register new voters. Democrats say this targets more liberal or independent voters. One woman who has been voting in Florida for 40 years says she has been asked to prove her citizenship, and six Florida members of Congress are asking Republican governor Rick Scott to stop the voter roll purge because of such cases.

In Miami-Dade County, nearly a fourth of the 1,638 people flagged by the state as ‘noncitizens’ turned out to be citizens. Florida, the renowned battleground of the butterfly ballot and the history-changing 2000 presidential election, is once again ground zero for the fight over every vote, and every voter.

WEIGH IN:

Are these tactics right or effective? How will they have an effect on this year’s election?

Guests:

Justin Levitt, associate professor of law, Loyola Law School

Daniel Smith, professor of political science, University of Florida

Penda Hair, co-director of the Advancement Project, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization that works to protect voter rights


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