Patt Morrison for June 18, 2012

Egypt’s fledgling democracy in crisis?

Egypt Elects A New President

Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Egyptian supporters celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi, in Tahrir Square on June 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's presidential elections held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for the for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi.

The Obama administration is warning the Egyptian military today: hand over power soon or lose billions of dollars in aid.

The past week has been a whirlwind for the people of Egypt, full of foreboding signs for the country’s fledgling democracy. Last week, a high court dissolved the Parliament. Votes were being counted in the presidential race yesterday. And with no parliament or president to weigh in, the military council announced it had drafted its own consitution, which boosts the military’s own power and curtails the president’s role. For many of the protesters in Tahrir Square, a new constitution became the symbol of true reform for Egypt.

WEIGH IN:

They hoped for new limits on the power of both the president and the Army. Have the democratic gains of the past two years effectively been erased? Will the country become a defacto military dictatorship?

Guest:

Borzou Daragahi, Middle East and North Africa correspondent, Financial Times

Steve Clemons, Washington editor-at-large, The Atlantic


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