Patt Morrison for June 22, 2012

U.S. Congressman John Lewis says ‘we must be the change we seek’ to revolutionize the world

Civil rights demonstrators, led by Dr Ma

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Civil rights demonstrators, led by Dr Martin Luther King (5th R), civil rights activist Ralph Abernathy (5th L), John Lewis (3rd L) and other civil and religious leaders, make their way from Selma to Montgomery on March 22, 1965 in Alabama, on the third leg of the Selma to Montgomery marches. The Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights ended three weeks and represented the political and emotional peak of the modern civil rights movement. The first march took place on March 07, 1965 ("Bloody Sunday") when 600 civil rights marchers were attacked by state and local police.

When John Lewis marched in the first of a series of black civil rights protest marches from Selma, Alabama to the State Capitol in Montgomery in 1965, even he probably would not have predicted that he would eventually represent Georgia’s fifth district as a United States Congressman for 25 years.

It was on that first march, however, that Lewis and hundreds of other protesters were attacked by local and state police in what is now known as Bloody Sunday, a brutal event that galvanized Lewis to become a legendary civil rights activist and the public servant he is today.

Now, Lewis hopes to inspire others to follow in his footsteps to help make the world a better place with his new book, “Across that Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change.” Lewis maintains that the best place to start when trying to revolutionize the world is with ourselves.

Guest:

Congressman John Lewis(D- GA), former chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)


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