Patt Morrison for June 22, 2012

How does Jerry Sandusky’s trial compare to others?

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse, on June 19, 2012 in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania.

The 12 jurors in the trial of former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky have been deliberating for over twelve hours.

They’re sequestered in the Pennsylvania town of Bellefonte. The goal is to insulate them from any outside influence on their decision-making and that means no Twitter, Facebook, radio, smartphones, iPads, laptops or TVs until they come to a verdict on the 48 child molestation charges against Sandusky. Theoretically, that would include newly disclosed allegations that Sandusky abused his adopted son Matt.

Now that the defense has rested, Patt talks with a defense attorney about how this molestation case compares to others and what he makes of the defense’s strategy.

Guest:

Leonard Levine, criminal defense attorney, ex-prosecutor specializing in sexual assault and sexual molestation cases; he’s represented priests in the sexual abuse scandals

Jef Feeley, Delaware bureau chief, Bloomberg News; he's been covering the trial


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