Patt Morrison for June 27, 2012

Scandalous or scandal-less? New investigation paints Fast and Furious operation as a non-scandal

Chairman Issa cuts off microphone of Democrat

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa (R-CA) (2nd R) and ranking member U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) (2nd L) stand after a five-hour mark up hearing on Capitol Hill June 20, 2012 in Washington, DC. Issa and the committee Republicans voted to hold U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress for refusing to hand over documents the GOP says are key to their investigation into the failed Fast and Furious operation. Before the start of the hearing, the White House asserted the documents are protected by executive privilege.

The discovery of two semiautomatic rifles being tracked by the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) at the murder scene of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in Peck Canyon, Arizona on December 14, 2010 eventually led to one of the biggest government scandals in recent history… or so we were led to believe by CBS News, Fox News, CNN, The New York Times, and others.

The recently published conclusion of a six-month investigation conducted by Fortune magazine, however, indicates that the so-called "Fast and the Furious" scandal might be more of a myth than the real McCoy. Based on its findings, the Fortune report reveals that the ATF may never have intentionally allowed guns to fall into the hands of Mexican drug cartels, in which case the scandal is essentially rendered baseless.

Join Patt as she interviews Katherine Eban, the reporter who conducted the investigation.

WEIGH IN:

Has this so-called scandal been overblown? Is the Fast and Furious operation being overly politicized in Washington during an election year?

Guest:

Katherine Eban, Fortune contributor who conducted the "Fast and Furious" investigation


blog comments powered by Disqus