Patt Morrison for July 19, 2012

Antonin Scalia on Piers Morgan

US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia listens, as he along with Justice Stephen Breyer testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a hearing entitled, “Considering the Role of Judges Under the Constitution of the United States" at the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, DC, on October 5, 2011.

The Supreme Court is possibly the last un-scandalized governmental institution. The court’s still-firm grip on decency and respect within the public forum is due in large part to the general reticence of sitting justices to saturate the airwaves with their images and opinions. There is a tradition of justices resisting the opportunity to become media characters. This tradition of judicial media exposure restraint contrasts starkly to many of their colleagues in the executive and legislative branches, who the public - perhaps not coincidentally - often regard as bozos.

WEIGH IN:

Is Antonin Scalia’s appearance on Piers Morgan a disturbing break with this tradition? Should it be a tradition at all? Would Scalia’s media appearance be more tasteful if he had appeared on a less trite program?

Guests:

Greg Storh, reporter for Bloomberg news in Washington, D.C. covering the Supreme Court

Marc Sandalow, Associate Academic Director for the University of California Washington Center in Washington, D.C. Former San Francisco Chronicle Washington Bureau Chief


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