Patt Morrison for August 7, 2012

Do cellphone safety standards need to be reassessed in the new smartphone era?

84th Annual Academy Awards - Arrivals

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Actor Chris Pratt takes images of the press as he arrives at the 84th Annual Academy Awards at the Hollywood & Highland Center February 26, 2012 in Hollywood, California.

Mobile phone exposure limits and testing methods should be re-evaluated, according to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) study released today. The report also concludes that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has not formally coordinated safety precautions with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The FCC first established exposure standards back in 1996, but now, in the smartphone era, consumers are using mobile devices significantly more often and for longer periods of time than they were at the end of the last millennium.

Last year, a World Health Organization report raised concerns about cellphone radiation (a concern not addressed in the GAO report) and Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) introduced a bill yesterday that would require radiation warning labels on the devices as well as tap the EPA to study the effects that radiation has on the human body.

WEIGH IN:

How concerned are you about the potential adverse impact that mobile phones may have on your health? Should manufacturers be required to include radiation warning labels on their products?

Guests:

Renee Sharp, California director and senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group that works to protect public health and the environment

Devra Davis, author of "Disconnet: the Truth About Cell Phone Radiation, What the Industry Has Done to Hide It, and How To Protect Your Family"


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