Patt Morrison for August 28, 2012

Rising number of Afghan forces turn their guns on NATO

US soldiers keep watch at the entrance o

JANGIR/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

US soldiers keep watch at the entrance of a military base near Alkozai village following the shooting of Afghan civilians allegedly committed by a rogue US soldier in Panjwayi district, Kandahar province on March 11, 2012. An AFP reporter counted 16 bodies -- including women and children -- in three Afghan houses after a rogue US soldier walked out of his base and began shooting civilians early Sunday. NATO's International Security Assistance Force said it had arrested a soldier "in connection to an incident that resulted in Afghan casualties in Kandahar province", without giving a figure for the dead or wounded.

Though most deaths during the war in Afghanistan have come during NATO and Afghan National forces facing off against the Taliban and al-Qaeda, a rising number of NATO soldiers have been killed from Afghan soldiers turning their guns against, seemingly, ‘their own team.’

According to Newsweek, members of Afghanistan’s security forces have killed 40 soldiers this year, which has surpassed last year’s total of 35. The “green-on-blue killings” have increased since the onset of the war.

According to the Long War Project, insider killings have accounted for 13 percent of NATO casualties in 2012, 6 percent in 2010 and 2011, 3 perecent in 2009, and less than 1 percent in 2008.Reasons for the increase of shootings are unclear.

According to the Long War Journal, US commanders have insisted that attacks are due to “cultural differences between Afghan and Western troops.” Of note is also the Taliban influence in Afghanistan, who have infiltrated members of the Afghan National army and posed as members.

According to CNN, A Department of Defense report in April stated that " a large majority of green-on-blue attacks are not attributable to insurgent infiltration of the ANSF [Afghan National Security Forces] but are due to isolated personal grievances against coalition personnel."

WEIGH IN:


What do you think of the conflict in Afghanistan?

Guests:

Gary Wilson, military analyst and former Marine

Bill Roggio, managing editor of the Long War Journal


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