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Obama’s speech: The moment arrives




US President Barack Obama pauses during his nomination acceptance speech at the Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 6, 2012 on the final day of the Democratic National Convention.
US President Barack Obama pauses during his nomination acceptance speech at the Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 6, 2012 on the final day of the Democratic National Convention.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
US President Barack Obama pauses during his nomination acceptance speech at the Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 6, 2012 on the final day of the Democratic National Convention.
Democratic vice presidential candidate, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks on stage during the final day of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena on September 6, 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Alex Wong/Getty Images
US President Barack Obama pauses during his nomination acceptance speech at the Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 6, 2012 on the final day of the Democratic National Convention.
Former U.S. President Bill Clintonspeaks on stage during day two of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena on September 5, 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The DNC that will run through September 7, will nominate U.S. President Barack Obama as the Democratic presidential candidate.
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images


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For the most part, the headlines for President Obama’s speech this morning were less than favorable: The Atlantic called it “dull,” Politico faulted the speech for being light on health care, and the San Francisco Chronicle offered up “Hope has become hang in there.” The most generous assessments were from The Daily Beast, which called it humble, and the Christian Science Monitor, which praised the President’s emphasis on his national security successes. How do you think the President did?

Plus, let’s face it: rhetoric and the unfiltered truth can be oil and water. Last week Paul Ryan earned criticism for a series of obvious errors in his speech at the Republican National Convention, so now it’s time to ask how the Democrats did.

WEIGH IN:

Does it surprise you to know that Bill Clinton earned a begrudging set of “mostly true” to “true” marks on the Politifact meter? Who do you think stretched the facts the most?

Guests:

Rob Farley, deputy managing editor for FactCheck.org

Kitty Felde, KPCC's Washington Correspondent

Robin Abcarian, National Correspondent at the Los Angeles Times