Take Two for October 17, 2012

Lockouts become a popular bargaining tool in the sports world

Florida Gators v Villanova Wildcats

Brian Bahr/Getty Images

Fans show their feelings regarding the NHL lockout as the Florida Gators take on the Villanova Wildcats in the second round of the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship at the Gaylord Entertainment Center on March 20, 2005 in Nashville, Tennessee. Villanova defeated Florida 76-65.

The National Hockey League lockout is over a month old. The regular season was set to begin last Thursday, but owners and players are still mired in negotiations.

Lately, it seems the lockout has become bargaining tool of choice in the sports world. The NHL has had three lockouts in its history, two in the last decade.

Last year, the National Basketball Association locked out players, and the National Football League, in the past year, locked out players and referees.

Beyond the use of lockouts, there's another thing these sports leagues have in common: team owners are all represented by the same team of lawyers.

They've come to be know as the "Lockout Lawyers."

To help us find out more about them is Dave Zirin, sports editor of the Nation and author of the forthcoming book, "Game Over: How Politics Are Turning The Sports World Upside Down."


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