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'Chasing Ice' doc uses timelapse to expose ice loss in Arctic




A picture taken on July 3, 2009 shows a fisherman sailing on the Ice Fjord of Ilulissat in Greenland. The Greenland ice sheet has lost 1,500 billion tonnes of ice since 2000, contributing 0.75 mm (0.03 inch) annually to sea levels, according to a study published in December 2009. Some experts believe the Arctic ice cap will disappear completely in summer months within 20 to 30 years.
A picture taken on July 3, 2009 shows a fisherman sailing on the Ice Fjord of Ilulissat in Greenland. The Greenland ice sheet has lost 1,500 billion tonnes of ice since 2000, contributing 0.75 mm (0.03 inch) annually to sea levels, according to a study published in December 2009. Some experts believe the Arctic ice cap will disappear completely in summer months within 20 to 30 years.
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

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Five years ago, Stanford student Jeff Orlowski landed a great gig working as a videographer for National Geographic photographer James Balog.

Balog was attempting the first expedition of what would become a long mission to use timelapse photography to track climate change and ice loss in the world's most extreme environments. Orlowski didn't know it then, but that first trip would turn into his new documentary, "Chasing Ice," which opens in Los Angeles on Friday in selected theaters.