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What immigration reform means for binational same-sex couples




Opponent of Proposition 8, California's anti-gay marriage bill, Eddie Reynoso celebrates at Los Angeles City Hall on February 7, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the voter-approved Proposition 8 measure violates the civil rights of gay men and lesbians.
Opponent of Proposition 8, California's anti-gay marriage bill, Eddie Reynoso celebrates at Los Angeles City Hall on February 7, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the voter-approved Proposition 8 measure violates the civil rights of gay men and lesbians.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Earlier this week, a group of senators, the so called Gang of Eight, unveiled their plans for immigration reform.

Their blueprint did not, however, include provisions for same-sex binational couples. Unlike straight couples, federal law currently does not allow gay citizens to marry their foreign partners, making them citizens.

We’ll speak with Patrick Egan, a professor of political science at New York University.