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Will Congress intervene before March 1 sequestration deadline?




Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) (C) answers reporters' questions during a news conference with (L-R) Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) (obscured) and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) at the Republican Party Headquarters on Capitol Hill February 13, 2013 in Washington, DC. The House Republican leaders squarly layed blame for the pending fiscal sequestration on President Barack Obama and said it was his and Senate Democrats who must avert the manditory spending cuts that will go into affect March 1.
Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) (C) answers reporters' questions during a news conference with (L-R) Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) (obscured) and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) at the Republican Party Headquarters on Capitol Hill February 13, 2013 in Washington, DC. The House Republican leaders squarly layed blame for the pending fiscal sequestration on President Barack Obama and said it was his and Senate Democrats who must avert the manditory spending cuts that will go into affect March 1.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Law enforcement officers furloughed, kids kicked out of Headstart programs, dangers to the safety of the food supply, and three-quarters of a million jobs lost.

Those are just some of the possible negative effects of sequestration, the $85 billion in across-the-board cuts that will kick in on the first day of March. That is, unless Congress intervenes.

And that's starting to look doubtful. With the latest on the looming budget cuts, we turn to Christina Bellantoni, political editor for the PBS Newshour.