Take Two for March 5, 2013

New standards for teaching climate change coming to public schools

Children place their hands on a life siz

CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

Children place their hands on a life size ice carving of a polar bear by animal sculptor Mark Coreth in Trafalgar Square, central London, on December 11, 2009. The sculpture was part of a campaign by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to highlight the plight of the polar bears in the Arctic, where melting ice is threatening their survival. EU nations are set to give more than six billion euros (nine billion dollars) to help the developing world tackle climate change in the next three years, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said Friday.

Climate change often comes up in policy debates, in news stories, but there's one place where the hot topic isn't discussed much: public school classrooms.

That's about to change.

This month, new standards for teaching science will be released and for the first time, and they will include a recommendation to teach kids about the evidence for man-made climate change starting as early as elementary school.

For more on this we're joined by Stacy Feldman, an editor at Inside Climate News.


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