Take Two for April 4, 2013

'Tattoo Nation' doc explores body art's journey from taboo to trendy (Photos)

Academy diversity

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Actor Danny Trejo sits for a tattoo in the documentary, "Tattoo Nation."

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Building mural dedicated to Danny Trejo in his hometown of Pacoima, Ca.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Exterior image of the Tattooland shop.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Jack Rudy (left), and the late Mike Brown at Tattooland on Whittier Blvd. in the early 1980s. Tattooland was the first shop to offer fine line prison style black and grey tattoos in a professional setting.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Tattoo artists (L-R) Don Ed Hardy, Jack Rudy, and Bob Roberts exchanged ideas and tricks of the tattoo trade in the late 1970s.

Tattoo Nation

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Tattoo artist Freddy Negrete tattoos fellow artist Don Ed Hardy in the early days of Tattooland in East LA.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Tattoo artist Freddy Negrete tattoos fellow artist Jack Rudy in the early days of Tattooland in East LA.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Tattoo artist Jack Rudy today.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Legendary tattoo artist Mark Mahoney in his Shamrock Social Club tattoo shop on Sunset Blvd.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Tattoo artist Feddy Negrete in front of a mural featuring his image as a peacemaker in East Los Angeles in 1983.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

Edward "Chuco" Cabellero was on fo the first two Chicanos to adorn most of his body with black and grey tattoos.

Tattoo Nation

Eric Schwartz

Legendary tattoo artist Charlie Cartwright is retired today and lives in Modesto, Ca.

Tattoo Nation

Courtesy Tattoo Nation Movie

David Oropeza was one of the first Chicanos to have a full body suit with back and grey tattoos.


One in five Americans have a tattoo, and although is quite common to sport ink, it wasn't always so. For years, tattoos were considered a sign of rebellion — meant for the likes of sailors and criminals.

The new documentary "Tattoo Nation" explores how the tattoo has evolved from an fringe practice to an elevated art form and how southern California played a key role in that evolution.

Corey Miller, the film's narrator and owner of the Upland tattoo shop Six Feet Under joins the show. 

"Tattoo Nation" opens at the ArcLight in Los Angeles on Friday April 5. Click here for ticket information

SHARE YOUR TATTOO STORIES:

We know a lot of you out there have ink of your own, probably each with its own story and significance. We want to hear about them! Share with with us in the comments below, on our Facebook page or tweet us a pic and story @taketwo.

Host Alex Cohen has some ink of her own. Below are three with special significance:

Left: Heart and horseshoe: "I got this one in Oakland in 2001 by a fantastic artist named Scott Silvia. I had fallen in love with my then boyfriend, now husband. I felt very lucky in love  - thus the heart and horseshoe. Updated in 2012 with the letter R by artist Andrew Moore."
 
Right: Horseshoe and ladybug – "I got this one in Pasadena in 2012 by artist Andrew Moore. This one celebrates my beautiful daughter Eliza, my ladybug, hence the E hidden in the ladybug. Not yet 2, Eliza has already developed a deep love of tattoos, temporary ones, of course."

Alex's first tattoo: Rose and moon: "I got this one when I was 17 at a tattoo shop in San Francisco’s Mission District. I lied and said I was 18 so I could get it. It was done by a female artist – and there weren’t many of those around back then. It does have some personal meaning to me, but looking at it now it seems so juvenile and rinky dink. Have been considering covering it for years!"


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