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Muslims fear a backlash after Boston bombings




BOSTON, MA - APRIL 16:  Flowers are left at a security gate near the scene of yesterday's bombing attack at the Boston Marathon on April 16, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts. The twin bombings, which occurred near the marathon finish line, resulted in the deaths of three people while hospitalizing at least 128. The bombings at the 116-year-old Boston race, resulted in heightened security across the nation with cancellations of many professional sporting events as authorities search for a motive to the violence.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 16: Flowers are left at a security gate near the scene of yesterday's bombing attack at the Boston Marathon on April 16, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts. The twin bombings, which occurred near the marathon finish line, resulted in the deaths of three people while hospitalizing at least 128. The bombings at the 116-year-old Boston race, resulted in heightened security across the nation with cancellations of many professional sporting events as authorities search for a motive to the violence. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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The culprit(s) behind Boston's deadly bombing is still at large, but Khaled Beydoun had one thought running through his mind: please don't let that person be an Arab or Muslim. For those communities in the US, there's a very real fear of a cultural backlash against them after a suspected terrorist attack.

Khaled Beydoun is himself an Arab-American and a fellow at UCLA.