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In South LA, the doctor might not be in, but the nurse will be




Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Rosaura Guizar, a patient at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles, discusses her medical concerns on March 12 with Simmi Gandhi, a nurse practitioner. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Rosaura Guizar, a patient at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles, receives medical treatment on March 12 from Simmi Gandhi, nurse practitioner. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Simmi Gandhi, a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles, uses a stethoscope to examine Hamdi Badar during a patient visit on March 12. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
New patients await inprocessing at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles on March 12. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC
Simmi Gandhi is a nurse practitioner at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Alex Figueroa, a medical assistant at the UMMA Clinic in South Los Angeles, checks on a patient's progress on March 12. This clinic and others like it are relying more on the skills of its nursing staff as the growing number of patients strains the ratio between caregivers and those in need of medical attention.
Christopher Okula/KPCC


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Many residents of South L.A struggle with chronic conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure but don't know how to deal with them. While they need a doctor's care, its often difficult to find one at community clinics, leaving the bulk of the care administered by another type of healthcare worker: nurses. KPCC's Jose Martinez reports.