Take Two for April 24, 2013

Girl Scouts LA chapter offers patch for video game development

Girl Scouts At 100: The Launch of ToGetHerThere

Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Girl Scouts of

Area Girl Scouts attend Girl Scouts At 100: The Launch of ToGetHerThere at Capitol Hill Cannon House Office Bldg, Caucus Room on February 1, 2012 in Washington, DC.

Play a video game nowadays, and you can earn all sorts of of trophies and achievements. When you complete a mission in Call of Duty without dying? Get the "Still Ticking" award. Or you can earn a "Golden Touch" prize for amassing 100,000 gold pieces in Skyrim.

That's all virtual fun, but there's a special, real-life award that you can get, not just for playing video games, but for developing them. How do you get it? By being a Girl Scout in LA.

The Girl Scouts of Greater LA, in partnership with Women in Games International, are in the process of developing a new patch in video game development, available only to scouts in this Los Angeles area. This comes just a month after Boy Scouts announced a new badge for game design.

"The organization is really focused on having girls more involved in understanding careers in STEM, specifically in video gaming," said Carol Diedrich, spokesperson for the Girl Scouts of Greater LA. "Right now we're developing the curriculum for the patch, soon to be released. Part of this is looking for sponsorship so that we can take this more globally."

A Girl Scouts patch differs from a badge in that it is local, and gives councils the opportunity to work with organizations on initiatives specific to a particular geographical area. Badges are national in nature, and are accepted among all Girl Scouts chapters across the country. 

Girls interested in earning the patch will have to design, develop and program a playable video game. In addition, girls will have the opportunity to learn more about possible professional opportunities in the industry. 

"The biggest thing that the public doesn't realize about Girl Scouts today, they think of us as cookies, camping, and crafts, the traditional girl scouts, but real girl scouts are so much more," said Diedrich.


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