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Technology's role in saving lives before a natural disaster




A volunteer helps clean up Jean McAdams' mobile home after it was overturned by a tornado May 20, 2013 near Shawnee, Oklahoma. A series of tornados moved across central Oklahoma May 19, killing two people and injuring at least 21.
A volunteer helps clean up Jean McAdams' mobile home after it was overturned by a tornado May 20, 2013 near Shawnee, Oklahoma. A series of tornados moved across central Oklahoma May 19, killing two people and injuring at least 21.
Brett Deering/Getty Images

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Sixteen minutes. That was about all the time that residents in Oklahoma had before the devestating tornado touched down on Monday.

While 16 minutes to prepare for a tornado doesn't seem like a lot of time, it's much more time than residents had 15 years ago. Developments in predicting disasters from tornadoes to hurricanes to tsunamis have improved to the point where they save lives on a regular basis. But what about earthquakes?

David Simpson, executive Director of the Center for Hazards Research at the University of Louisville, joins the show to fill us in on what new technologies could save us from a devastating natural disaster.