Take Two for June 28, 2013

Friday Flashback: SCOTUS decisions, NSA scandal and more

Field Director Charles White of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) speaks at a podium outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Washington, D.C.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Field Director Charles White of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) speaks at a podium outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Washington, D.C.

It's the end of the week, and time for a little analysis of the biggest news stories of the week. Joining us today from New York City, Heidi Moore of the Guardian, and right across the table here in Pasadena, James Rainey of the Los Angeles Times.

We start with the big story of the week, the Supreme Court. Rulings on two big subjects: Prop 8 and DOMA. A conservative Supreme Court essentially giving their OK to same sex marriage.  

Many conservatives were not happy with the court on this. Does it make sense for conservatives, at least some conservatives, to carry on the defense of what they now call "natural" marriage?

In the other big ruling this week, the court struck down a provision of The Voting Rights Act, and this time it was liberals who were miffed with the Justices. How important might this be, and do you think it will actually effect the results of future elections?

The Senate passed the comprehensive immigration reform package, and now it moves to the House. Is it dead on arrival?

Besides immigrants who were hoping they'd be able to obtain legal status, or even citizenship, who are the losers here if this fails in the House. Who are the winners?

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's father was on The Today Show this morning. He said his son had broken the law, but he didn't feel he'd committed treason. What's the latest intelligence on Edward Snowden? Does anybody even know where his is?

His father also said he thinks his son would return home to stand trial, under certain conditions. Do you think that's exactly what he wants? A chance to make the case for what he did in a court of law?

The story that Snowden pushed off the front page, the so-called IRS scandal. Now, there are reports that the IRS wasn't just targeting conservative groups, they were also investigating liberal and progressive groups that were seeking tax exempt status. Does this sort of minimize the scandal part of this story?


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