Take Two for October 11, 2013

Friday Flashback: Paul Ryan, John Boehner's approval rating and more

Government Shutdown Continues Without Resolution

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) is trailed by reporters following a meeting of the House Republican conference at the U.S. Capitol October 10, 2013 in Washington, DC. Speaker of the House John Boehner said earlier today that he is prepared to offer a short-term increase in the debt limit in a separate meeting later today with Obama.

It's time for our Friday Flashback, a look back and analysis of the week's biggest news stories. Today, we've got our "A-team" in today. Joining us in the studio, is James Rainey of the LA Times and Nancy Cook of National Journal in Washington, DC. 

After what seems like forever, finally some sense that our political leaders might be inching toward a deal, if not to reopen the government, than to at least avoid the prospect of the nation defaulting on its debt. What's the latest there?

Last week, we asked if there might be someone who could step forward and get things moving. That someone was Paul Ryan, the former vice-presidential candidate and budget wonk has been very quiet lately. Earlier this week, he offered a plan that looks an awful lot like what everybody is talking about now. Ryan is well-liked by both conservative and moderate Republicans. Is he the one who might be able to broker a deal?

Even if these negotiations succeed, what's the best we can hope for, really? A short delay until the next display of brinksmanship in November?

All politicians like to talk about what the people want, but the House Speaker, John Boehner, seems to never make a statement without talking about what the American people want. 

If you believe the latest NBC/Wall Street Journal poll, John Boehner might not be all that in touch with the American people. More than half of those surveyed blame the GOP for the shutdown, and only a third say its President Obama's fault. The approval rating for the Republican party is at an all time low. 

A lot of bad news in there for the GOP. Are numbers like these going to have any effect on the leadership of the party, or on the right wing?


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