Take Two for October 15, 2013

The US Supreme Court Building is seen in
Today the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in an affirmative action case involving the state of Michigan. But the decision could also affect the ban on affirmative action here in California.
Government Shutdown Enters 2nd Week

How close are the Senate and House to ending the shutdown?

The Senate is reportedly close to a deal that would reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling — at least until early next year. But the House is struggling to come up with a plan of its own because the two proposals appear to be pretty different.
Guatemala DNA

Guatemalans reach out in LA to help solve painful mysteries

A forensic group is using DNA to help families find relatives who disappeared during Guatemala's brutal civil war. Now they're reaching out to LA area immigrants.
Food Bank

Hunger in the Valley: Food banks face a dilemma

Food banks have become a primary source of nutrition for many families in the Central Valley. The region ranks among the highest in the nation when it comes to hunger, as well as diseases linked to poor nutrition such as diabetes and obesity.

Report: Kids in foster care do worse in school

New research finds foster kids have lower standardized test scores and the highest dropout rate. As the California Report's Tara Siler explains, the study comes as the state is trying to direct more resources to at-risk students.
San Diego Chargers vs. Los Angeles Raiders
It's the last day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, a time celebrating the contributions of Latinos to the United States. There have been concerts and art exhibits highlighting the accomplishments of Latinos past and present, but two trailblazing Chicanos have been all but forgotten.
TLC Stops By Music Choice's "You & A"

Tuesday Reviewsday: Paul McCartney, TLC, Bad Things and more

Now it's time for Tuesday Reviewsday our weekly new music segment. Shirley Halperin, music editor of The Hollywood Reporter, and Chris Martins, senior writer with Spin Magazine join us today.
House Ways And Means Committee Holds Hearing On Statutory Debt Limit

Rep. Tom McClintock on government shutdown

California Representative Tom McClintock, a Republican who represents a district stretching from Lake Tahoe down to Kings Canyon National Park, joins the show to address what's happening on Capitol Hill.
Petrol Queue

How the 1973 oil embargo changed the way we feel about energy

40 years ago, if your license plate ended in an even number, you could only fill your tank on even numbered days. The country was struggling with the effects of an oil embargo imposed by Arab members of OPEC, and designed to punish America for supporting Israel in the 1973 war with Egypt and Syria.

Marine base expansion in Joshua Tree faces opposition

The Mojave Desert communities around Joshua Tree tend to be among the most pro-military in the state. Twenty-nine Palms, after all, is home to the world's largest US Marine base.
modern family

UCLA study shows diversity in TV can lead to higher ratings

Results of a new UCLA study show that shows with a racially diverse cast and writers can lead to higher ratings.
Delta

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's fragile ecology

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was once a vast tidal marshland and inland estuary. Now thousands of miles of fragile levees surround artificial islands below sea level. More than 90 percent of wetlands have disappeared, and native fish are dying.
phoenix deportation

Hundreds protest deportations in Phoenix

Hundreds marched in Phoenix on Monday to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office to protest the Obama administration's deportation policies.
Esquire Network

'Knife Fight' features local chefs in cooking competition

The cooking competition show has become a well-worn format on TV, but a new program on the brand new Esquire network has something special for local audiences: local chefs.
Find an archived Episode: