Take Two for November 4, 2013

Africa's Maasai people seek royalties for use of their name

LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images

Nissan Jonathan Meshami of the Maasai Warrior cricket team from Kenya prepares to take part in a friendly match against the Charity VIII team during opening ceremony activities of the "Last Man Stands" World Championships at Lords Nursery ground in London on August 25, 2013. The Maasai Warriors, a team from Kenya who use cricket to promote social change, went on to lose the match. Running between August 25 and September 4, the championship sees twelve international cricket teams compete in 8-aside T20 cricket. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL

LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images

Tepele Francis Siranga Naimodo of the Maasai Warrior cricket team from Kenya prepares to take part in a friendly match against the Charity VIII team during opening ceremony activities of the "Last Man Stands" World Championships at Lords Nursery ground in London on August 25, 2013. The Maasai Warriors, a team from Kenya who use cricket to promote social change, went on to lose the match. Running between August 25 and September 4, the championship sees twelve international cricket teams compete in 8-aside T20 cricket. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL


Throughout Kenya and Tanzania, the Maasai  people lead a nomadic life.

They're also one of most well-known indigenous groups in Africa, often dressed in bright red sheets wrapped around like togas, some sporting elaborate jewelry and homemade sandals. But that Maasai  "style" is gracing more than these native people.

Global companies are using their imagery to design cars, pens, and purses, and the Maasai are looking to get a cut from those who are taking cues from their culture.

For more we're joined by Bloomberg Businessweek reporter Stephan Faris. 


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