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What's behind the decline in cold cereal sales in the US?

"Studies show there is an association between regularly skipping breakfast and higher body mass index," an obesity researcher says. "But it does not necessarily represent cause and effect."

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A bowl of cold cereal.

For decades, Americans have started their day with one of the easier dishes to prepare: cereal. Lately, however, cereal companies have been looking at some soggy sales. 

Kellogg recently announced that they would be cutting thousands of jobs in an effort to boost profits, and their competitor, General Mills, has shifted their focus away from marketing cereal and are now pushing yogurt brands instead. 

Whether colorful, whole grain, full of nutrients or full of sugar, cereal holds a cultural connection that goes past the breakfast table.

Topher Ellis, co-author of "The Great American Cereal Book: How Breakfast Got Its Crunch," says one of the main reasons for this decline is due to shifting demographics. 

"You've got falling birth rates, which means clearly fewer kids," said Ellis on Take Two. "Hispanics, which are a growing population in the United States, eat less ready-to-eat cereal than non-Hispanics."

Another factor is Americans' changing concerns over nutrition. Some parents are deciding not to feed their kids the sugary cereals kids from previous generations enjoyed. It seems that cereal companies' efforts to offer cereals with whole grains and fiber have not made enough of a difference.

"They've made very hearty attempts at pulling out sugar and putting in whole grains into the cereals," said Ellis. "By and large they are healthier than they were, say, in the '60s."

In addition, as our lifestyles become more and more hectic, fewer people are are sitting down to eat breakfast.

"Instant foods such as cereal bars, shakes, drive through fast food, breakfast biscuits, Starbucks offering items sold with morning coffee. All these things are helping lead to this decline," said Ellis. 

Take Two wants to know: Are you a cereal lover? If so what's your favorite cereal and why? If not, what do you not like about it?  Tell us in the comments!

 
 

via RebelMouse

 

What are your kids favorite dishes? Where did you buy the ingredients, and why does he or she love the food so much.Share your best recipes to help us create the ultimate kids menu. Email your responses to klepore@scpr.org OR tweet/Instagram using the hashtag #KPCCkidsfood.


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